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Grupo cantosdelmundo-2020

Público·31 miembros
David Gromov
David Gromov

Sir2 Reverb


A collection of Impulse responses recorded in small spaces. My most common use of these is to make synthesizers feel more alive but they work very well on drums and vocals too. These impulses have been edited quite a lot and I have used both real rooms and reverb units to create the impulses.




Sir2 reverb


Download Zip: https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Ftinourl.com%2F2tTc5c&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AOvVaw2EDxiO2D_mkXN9wVoJ4pZx



I have had In trial mode Rogue Amoeba "Audio Hijack" capture the audio output of my video player app and it was quite OK with Alloy 2 I already had as AU plugin ; however, I was unable to make the convolver I identified ( Fog convolver) work with my personal filters. It worked with their reverb wizardry though.


Question 1: I've noticed that using different reverbs and reverb engines creates not only different reverbs, but changes the sound as a whole, for example bringing some instruments to the front and losing others in the mix. Is this the reason why there is obviously no recommended EQ settings for different instruments? I had originally expected to find something on the web that says, "Trombones: 3 KHz +2 DB", "Cellos: 80 Hz -1 DB" or whatever. There is nothing or at least I haven't found it. My assumption now would be that this may be useless because of the change of sound that happens when the signal goes through the reverb. Is that so or what's the reason there is no "EQ settings for dummies"?


Question 2: There's often talk of dry-wet-ratio, like 80:20, particularly to bring some instruments to the front and others to the back. If I use a convolution reverb as a send effect, how do I calculate this ratio from the decibel settings for different channels (in Cubase)? For example, my Violins channel has -3 DB Send Level and SIR2 convolution reverb as used in the Effect Channel says Wet Signal is at (around) DB 0. So what's my ratio? (Please forgive me if the question is totally silly. I'm still trying to cover some basics but it's hard.)


Uh yes, I played around with the EQ and reverb settings within Cubase to achieve something like a John Barry sound. (I'm considering using Vienna Studio in the future, but until then I'm trying out all kind of stuff). If anyone of you would like to listen in and tell me what's exactly wrong/right with the mix, I'd be very happy! The hastily crafted sound snippets are here: =165


Uh yes, I forgot another question regarding the dry-wet-ratio (Question 3): I read somewhere on the web, that instruments in the front need less reverb (let's say dry:wet 80:20) than instruments in the back of the orchestra (20:80). Is this really true, because when I listen to orchestral music, strings always seem to a nice, particularly long reverb tail, much more anyway than let's say xylophone which as part of the percussion section in the back would have more reverb according to this rule. Why is this, or is the truth more complicated than that? Thanks in advance!


ad 2. All the talk about dry/wet ratios of reverberation mean nothing without knowing the original "dry" signal, without knowing the way the reverb engine technically works, and without knowing how these techniques are actually implemented*). Ideally these values you quoted can give you a rough idea what the they are meant to achieve ("more reverb", "less reverb"), but they are meaningless without context.


ad 3. What you read is a nice example of possible misunderstandings due to (certainly well-meant) information on the web without context. :-) It is most likely that closer instruments will seem to sound "drier" than those further away - but that's not necessarily just a function of reverb level (i.e. "dry/wet ratio"). The shape and sound of the so-called "early reflections" as well as the initial delay between the signal and the appearance of the first reflections are at least as important as the actual reverb level.


If you are looking for a quick and easy way to get great reverb with VSL instruments, (without being an audio engineer) MIRx and MIR are amazing! And, MIRx is very inexpensive, just be aware that it is not a plug in, it can only be used on VSL instruments inside of VIP (not sure if it works in VI or not).


Delay Time calculator can be used to sync your reverb and delay times to the tempo of your song. Some people also use it to time their percussion instruments to begin and end (ring out) in time with their song.


I primarily use this tool for reverb to get a tighter rhythmic affect. Generally, I use shorter time on percussive sounds (I tend to like punchier drums) and longer times on other instruments (with the exception of lowers frequencies.) It's often a good idea to roll off lower frequencies, but always use your ears in context with the mix.


To calculate the pre-delay of your reverb, you can use different settings that divide into the total reverb time, which is the time it takes for the sound pressure level to reduce by 60 dB (also known as RT60). Here's an example:


You can use the delay lengths of different note values as a starting point for your pre-delay and decay time. In this example, the 1/64 note delay time was used for the pre-delay, but you can also try the 1/128 or 1/32 delay time. To adjust the decay time, subtract the pre-delay time from the total reverb time to get the decay time. In this example, the decay time is 968.75 ms.


Creating depth in your track can be achieved by using multiple reverb settings for different instruments. For example, you can use a long reverb tail for strings and keep the kick drum up front. However, be careful as too many reverbs can negatively affect your mix, especially if the instruments are meant to sound like they are in the same room. In this case, using the same room reverb for all instruments can create the desired effect. Additionally, adjusting the reverb for the snare to die just before the next hit and using a low and high cut on the reverb can help clean up the mix. A compressor on the reverb send and sidechaining it to the audio source can also help reduce the reverb when the instrument plays.


There's a lot of info about reverb and delay types below, so I've created an index that you can click and go to the topic immediately. There are also links to bring you back to this index.


Reverb is an essential effect in music production, used to simulate the natural reflections of sound in a physical space. There are several different types of reverb, each with its own unique characteristics and uses. In this article, we will explore the different types of reverb, including Hall Reverb, Chamber Reverb, Plate Reverb, Room Reverb, Spring Reverb, Algorithmic Reverb, Convolution Reverb, Shimmer Reverb, and Non-Linear Reverb. We will also discuss the various parameter settings for each type of reverb, as well as popular VST (virtual studio technology) reverb plugins for each type.


Hall reverb is a type of reverb that simulates the sound of a large concert hall or cathedral. It creates a sense of spaciousness and distance, and is often used for adding a sense of grandeur and scale to orchestral and choral music. The settings for hall reverb include the reverb time, damping, pre-delay, and early reflection level. The reverb time controls the duration of the reverb tail, damping controls the frequency decay, pre-delay adds a delay before the onset of the reverb, and early reflection level controls the level of the initial reflections.


The settings on a hall reverb typically include parameters such as room size, decay time, and damping. Room size controls the overall size of the hall, decay time controls how long the reverb tail lasts, and damping controls the amount of high-frequency damping in the reverb tail.


Hall reverb is often used in classical music, orchestras, and other genres that require a large and spacious sound. It can also be used to add a sense of grandeur to vocals, drums, and other instruments.


Chamber reverb simulates the sound of a small, enclosed space such as a room or chamber. It creates a sense of intimacy and warmth and is often used for adding depth and character to vocals, drums, and other percussive instruments. The settings for chamber reverb include the reverb time, damping, pre-delay, and early reflection level. The reverb time controls the duration of the reverb tail, damping controls the frequency decay, pre-delay adds a delay before the onset of the reverb, and early reflection level controls the level of the initial reflections.


The settings on a chamber reverb typically include parameters such as room size, decay time, and damping. Room size controls the overall size of the chamber, decay time controls how long the reverb tail lasts, and damping controls the amount of high-frequency damping in the reverb tail.


Chamber reverb is often used in classical music, jazz, and other genres that require a natural and realistic reverb sound. It can also be used to add depth and dimension to vocals, drums, and other instruments.


Room reverb is a type of reverb that simulates the natural reverberation of sound in a room. It is often used to add a sense of space and realism to a mix. Room reverb can be used to create a sense of intimacy in a recording or to make a track sound as if it was recorded in a large concert hall.


Some common settings for room reverb include decay time, which controls how long the reverb tail lasts, and early reflections, which control the level of the initial reflections that occur before the reverb tail.


Room reverb is a versatile reverb that can be used in many different music genres. It can be used to add depth and space to a mix, making it sound more natural and realistic. Room reverb can also be used to create a sense of intimacy in a recording, making it sound as if the listener is in the room with the musicians.


Plate reverb simulates the sound of a large metal plate that is vibrated by a transducer. It creates a sense of brightness and clarity, and is often used for adding a sense of space to vocals and instruments. The settings for plate reverb include the reverb time, damping, pre-delay, and early reflection level. The reverb time controls the duration of the reverb tail, damping controls the frequency decay, pre-delay adds a delay before the onset of the reverb, and early reflection level controls the level of the initial reflections. 350c69d7ab


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